resource management

Women participate in all segments of the seafood industry, including fishing, farming, trading and selling, monitoring and administration. But the widespread lack of consideration for their role and work in the seafood industry is, in many respects, disadvantageous to them and ultimately bars them from participating fully and equitably in the industry.¬†The primary aim of […]

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This paper, produced by CIFOR, provides a review of existing research and data on forests and gender in the Amazon region of South America. Significant gaps are identified particularly regarding governance, ownership and local perceptions and dynamics. Such missing information is necessary for ensuring successful implementation of sustainability efforts.

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This section of the FAO’s Unasylva publication highlights the link between gender inequality in the forestry sector and food insecurity. While men typically focus on one or two species of trees for timber production, women often rely on a wider variety of species with multiple uses for food, medicine and fuel needs. This results in differing priorities in the way of resource management between men and women. Women’s priorities, however, are often overlooked resulting in losses in livelihood and subsistence needs.

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Within the global forestry sector, women are at a disadvantage. Women often possess distinct and valuable knowledge and priorities regarding forest resources, which often coincide with household health and nutritional interests. They, however, often lack agency and economic opportunity in forest management activities and decision-making. This report investigates these linkages and the chain-reaction women’s empowerment in the forestry sector can have on sustainable management and food security.

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Women are heavily involved in the Non-Timber Forest Product (NTFP) sector, but earn little for their work and contributions. While the industry offers a great deal of promise in the way of economic-gain for women, it is not without it’s obstacles. This publication explores the experience of these women engaged in NTFP work, examining critical challenges and possibilities. Included is a review of various strategies employed by organizations seeking to improve earnings and maintain resource access for women.

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Women in Environmental Decision Making: Case Studies in Ecuador, Liberia and The Philippines

Despite a high rate of involvement within the environmental sector, women, who often rely on natural resources in their daily lives for basic subsistence needs, have a low rate of participation in environmental decision making. IUCN’s Global Gender Office, in collaboration with Conservation International, has produced this report to examine the status of women in environmental decision making roles in Liberia, Ecuador and The Philippines. The report highlights the gaps in country-specific policy and implementation pertaining to women and the environment, and offers recommendations on how to remedy the issues at hand.

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This report examines the gender dimensions of REDD+. Findings from the Center for International Forestry Research suggests that women are less involved in and knowledgeable of REDD+ program initiatives, design and implementation than men despite equivalent usage of forest resources. Site-specific data is included along with an analysis and discussion of results.

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Due to societal roles and responsibilities, women, as the globally predominant users of natural resources, are disproportionately affected by the degradation of natural resources. Nevertheless, women are systematically left out of management discussions and action. This document examines the relationships between poverty, gender and natural resource management, and the ways in which women’s empowerment can lead to improved economic opportunity and ecosystem health.

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The AU’s Gender Policy focuses on closing the equality gap between men and women in general and particularly addressing gender inequalities which have resulted in women’s disempowerments and the feminisation of poverty, in order to have a better understanding of the contribution of women in development.

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