Nepal

Hariyo Ban: REDD+ for Economic Development in Nepal: A national, local-level initiative

The Hariyo Ban project—which is named after the Nepali saying “Hariyo Ban Nepal ko Dhan” meaning “healthy green forests are the wealth of Nepal”—is a five-year initiative (2011-2016) that aims to reduce the adverse impacts of climate change and threats to biodiversity in Nepal. Beginning in 2011 and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Hariyo Ban […]

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This book of case studies represents a collaborative effort to explore the potential of biofuels to provide sustainable livelihoods and local sources of energy for people in rural areas of developing countries, with a special emphasis on women. Although there are many forms of bio-energy that can be useful in this regard, our focus in […]

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The relevance of gender issues is not well understood by many practitioners involved in climate change mitigation investments and financing mechanisms. Prevailing approaches to reducing emissions have prioritized scientific and technological measures, often at the expense of social and behavioral considerations. Most of the mitigation projects and funds so far have supported large-scale energy infrastructure […]

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Cleaner fuels, improved efficiency and adoption of renewable energy technologies offer important possibilities for low-carbon economic development and reductions in overall greenhouse gas emissions. These possibilities are especially important for women in developing countries who currently play critical roles in supplying and managing traditional biomass fuels. The UN’s Sustainable Energy for All initiative is highlighting […]

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Nepal Climate Change Gender Action Plan (ccGAP) Report

Maplecroft’s Climate Change Risk Atlas 2010 ranked Nepal as the fourth most vulnerable country to climate change in the world. Although Nepal has achieved remarkable improvements over the past few decades, it remains one of the poorest countries in the world, with an estimated 55 percent of Nepalese falling below the international poverty line of $1.25 per day. Classified as a Least Developed Country (LDC) by the United Nations and ranking 115th in terms (2008) of Gross Domestic Production (GDP), Nepal’s GDP remains the lowest amongst all South Asian countries.

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