The 2022 call for proposals is now closed but you can still download and review the entire 2022 RISE Call for Proposals, an essential tool that supported applicants.

EN ES

Resilient, Inclusive and Sustainable Environments

(RISE grants challenge)

About the 2022 call for RISE grants challenge proposals
Apply for RISE funds

Call for proposals

In 2022, the world is arguably facing multiple overlapping pandemics – COVID-19 itself together with gender-based violence (GBV), climate change and biodiversity loss.

Gender-based violence and environment linkages are complex and multi-layered; however, these threats to human rights and healthy ecosystems are not insurmountable. Urgent action to end GBV, promote gender equality and social inclusion and protect the environment is crucial – and requires cooperation and shared commitment across sectors.

Following lessons and promising practices from the previous two RISE phases, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), under its partnership with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) on Advancing Gender in the Environment (AGENT) and its Gender-Based Violence and Environment Linkages Center (GBV-ENV Center) will continue to support evidence-based strategies to address gender-based violence in environment and climate-related programming. RISE will invest in: 

  • a) new interventions that address GBV in environment sectors; 
  • b) integrated approaches that embed GBV components in existing environmental programming or related activities; and 
  • c) existing GBV-environment programming that aims to continue, scale up or replicate an intervention.

RISE anticipates funding between three and six projects of USD 100,000 – USD 400,000 each, with implementation timelines of 18-24 months in one or more targeted geographies. RISE grantees participate as a RISE learning cohort and benefit from technical support and a community of practice from IUCN and partners via the GBV-ENV Center. In 2022, RISE priorities include: generating learning on promising practices for addressing gender-based violence in climate-vulnerable contexts and in relation to protecting the rights and safety of environmental defenders, as well as adaptive management in the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Interventions RISE seeks to fund

Partnerships between environmental, gender equality and GBV-expert, indigenous peoples and/or community-based organisations, networks or decision-makers 

 

Locally or community-led or driven approaches, in line with rights-based principles and approaches;

Survivor-centred and trauma-informed approaches;

Evidence-based strategies to address gender-based violence in environment-focused sectors 

Strategies, tools and capacities contributing to the overall global knowledge and capacity base to address GBV and environment linkages

Institutional learning  to improve implementation and scale-up of rights-based gender-responsive environment approaches and outcomes

Innovative arrangements – e.g., via partnerships, institutional enabling conditions, policy reform or social protection measures – that contribute to existing evidence on addressing gender-based violence in environment linkages

Enabling conditions to implement interventions to reduce gender-based violence and support survivors, for example through legislative action, infrastructure or institutionalisation, or mobilising political will

Bridging knowledge gaps, for example through deepening local and contextual knowledge; showcasing context-specific promising practices; and/ or demonstrating how RISE grantees’ interventions will influence national, regional or global policy and programming agendas

 

 

 

 

Who can apply?

Targeted geographies in 2022

Projects must be implemented in one or more of the following targeted geographies:

  • Central America and the Caribbean
  • Eastern and Southern Africa
  • South and Southeast Asia

To view a full list of countries, please read the Call for Proposals document (English | Español).

Eligible applicants

RISE is open to legally registered local, national, regional, or international organisations, including
but not limited to:

  • Non-governmental organisations (NGOs);
  • Grassroots, local and community-based organisations (CBOs), including women, youth-led and LGBTQI organisations;
  • Civil society organisations (CSOs);
  • Indigenous Peoples’ Organisations (IPOs);
  • Women-owned/women-led enterprises;
  • Faith-based organisations (FBOs);
  • International non-governmental organisations (INGOs);
  • Intergovernmental organisations (IGOs);
  • Universities and other academic institutions;
  • Research institutes and think tanks;
  • Private sector companies ;Private sector companies;
  • Consortiums, partnerships and other already existing forms of collaboration;
  • Organisations that are members of IUCN and/or others with track record improving environment outcomes; and
  • Organisations that have previously applied for and/or received RISE Challenge funding.

Partnership and collaborations

RISE encourages partnerships between environmental, gender equality and GBV-expert, Indigenous Peoples and/or community-based organisations, local communities and relevant experts. Applicants must meet the requirements set in the Call for Proposals (English | Español).

Local Presence

Applicants must:

  • Already have presence in the country in which the activities are proposed to be implemented, OR
  • Be a local organisation, OR
  • Have a duly registered local partner that meets the requirements for consortia and partnerships.

Thematic responsiveness

In 2022, RISE priorities include: generating learning on promising practices for addressing gender-based violence in climate-vulnerable contexts and in relation to protecting the rights and safety of environmental defenders, as well as adaptive management in the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Operational and administrative capacity

Eligible applicants must have sufficient capacity to allow for professional and timely implementation of proposed projects.

Language

Applicants must summit their proposal in English or Spanish.

Projects must be implemented in one or more of the following candidate geographies:

  • Central America and the Caribbean
  • Eastern and Southern Africa
  • South and Southeast Asia

RISE is open to legally registered local, national, regional, or international organisations, including
but not limited to:

  • Non-governmental organisations (NGOs);
  • Grassroots, local and community-based organisations (CBOs), including women, youth-led and LGBTQI organisations;
  • Civil society organisations (CSOs);
  • Indigenous Peoples’ Organisations (IPOs);
  • Women-owned/women-led enterprises;
  • Faith-based organisations (FBOs);
  • International non-governmental organisations (INGOs);
  • Intergovernmental organisations (IGOs);
  • Universities and other academic institutions;
  • Research institutes and think tanks;
  • Private sector companies ;Private sector companies;
  • Consortiums, partnerships and other already existing forms of collaboration;
  • Organisations that are members of IUCN and/or others with track record improving environment outcomes; and
  • Organisations that have previously applied for and/or received RISE Challenge funding.

RISE encourages partnerships between environmental, gender equality and GBV-expert, Indigenous Peoples and/or community-based organisations, local communities and relevant experts. Applicants must meet the requirements set in the Call for Proposals.

Applicants must already have presence in the country in which the activities are proposed to be implemented, OR be a local organisation, OR have a duly registered local partner that meets the requirements for consortia and partnerships.

In 2022, RISE priorities include: generating learning on promising practices for addressing gender-based violence in climate-vulnerable contexts and in relation to protecting the rights and safety of environmental defenders, as well as adaptive management in the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Eligible applicants must have sufficient capacity to allow for professional and timely implementation of proposed projects.

Applicants must summit their proposal in English or Spanish.

Online Application

The 2022 call for proposals is now closed, thank you for your interest and applications!

The 2022 call for proposals is now closed but you can still download and review the 2022 RISE Call for Proposals:

RISE webinar on why and how to apply

A virtual webinar explaining the purpose, eligibility criteria and application components was held on June 22, 2022 at 9:00 a.m. EDT.

Watch here the recording in English

Ver aquí la grabación en Español

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

A virtual webinar explaining the purpose, eligibility criteria and application components was held on June 22, 2022 and the window to submit questions to the RISE team via email has been extended until July 01, 2022. All questions and answers are available below:

RISE has up to between USD 1,475,000 to USD 1,875,000 to award in 2022. RISE seeks to support up to six projects of USD 100,000-400,000 each. Please refer to section 7.1 in the call for proposals for more details.

Projects should be implemented over an 18 – 24 month timeline, with all projects ending by 31 December 2024. See section 7.3 in the call for proposals.

There are no set amount of projects for each region. Contingent on the quality and priorities of the submitted proposals, selected RISE projects will be implemented in one or more of the targeted geographies.

RISE grantees remain eligible to apply for more RISE funding in future calls for proposals. In addition, RISE grantees will participate in a learning cohort to share peer learning and increase capacities and impact.

Yes. The United Nations is recognised as an intergovernmental organisation and is included in the list of eligible applicants in section 5.4 of the call for proposals. See sections 5.4 and 5.6 in the call for proposals to read about eligible applicants and partnership requirements.

Yes, CBOs and CSOs are eligible to apply for the RISE 2022 grant. See sections 5.4 and 5.6 in the call for proposals to read about eligible applicants and partnership requirements.

Yes, public and private universities, their departments and other academic institutions are eligible to apply. See sections 5.4 and 5.6 in the call for proposals to read about eligible applicants and partnership requirements.

Yes, NGOs are eligible to apply for the RISE 2022 grant. See sections 5.4 and 5.6 in the call for proposals to read about eligible applicants and partnership requirements.

Yes, research institutions and think tanks are eligible to apply. See sections 5.4 and 5.6 in the call for applications to read about eligible applicants and partnership requirements.

No, individuals are not eligible to apply. Please see sections 5.4 and 5.5 to read about eligible and ineligible applicants. Partnerships are also a requirement for the 2022 RISE call for applications. Please see section 5.6 for requirements for partnerships and collaborations. 

Eligibility requirements are outlined in the call for proposals. Please see section 5 of the call for proposals for eligibility requirements, including targeted geographies, eligible applicants and what RISE will fund.

RISE is open to legally registered local, national, regional, or international organisations.

As indicated in section 5.7.2 under local presence, the applicant must already have a presence in the country where the activities are proposed to be implemented, OR be a local organisation, OR have a duly registered local partner that meets the requirements for consortia and partnerships. It is preferred that at least one of the partners is a grassroots, locally-led organisation; that is, local people and institutions who possess the capability, connectedness and credibility to drive change in their own countries and communities. IUCN will require supporting documentation to demonstrate legal status to operate where the intervention is taking place. See section 5.6 of the call for proposals on requirements for partnerships and collaborations.

All partners should meet the eligibility requirements. Any government public entity or organisation is ineligible to apply, either as a lead applicant or partner. See the full list of eligible applicants in section 5.4 in the call for proposals.

Partnerships are required for the 2022 RISE call for applications, and we encourage you to formalise partnerships to ensure partners are on board. Please see section 5.6 for requirements for partnerships and collaborations.

The applicant must already have a presence in the country where the activities are proposed to be implemented, OR be a local organisation, OR have a duly registered local partner that meets the requirements for consortia and partnerships.

It is preferred that at least one of the partners is a grassroots, locally-led organisation; that is, local people and institutions who possess the capability, connectedness and credibility to drive change in their own countries and communities. IUCN will require supporting documentation to demonstrate legal status to operate where the intervention is taking place.

Yes, RISE welcomes new partnerships and networks.

Yes. Consortiums, partnerships and other already existing forms of collaboration are eligible to apply. See section 5.6 in the CfP for requirements for partnerships and collaborations.

There can only be one lead applicant who submits the proposal on behalf of all partners. Consortiums can be made up of several organisations.

RISE does not have a preference but encourages partnerships with community-based organisations and local NGOs. The lead applicant must meet all eligibility requirements outlined in section 5 of the call for proposals.

Yes, partnerships are required, and the lead applicant will be responsible for sub-granting and reporting to IUCN.

You will have to develop the proposal and budget in partnership – selecting a partner should occur during the drafting of the proposal. Partnerships will also be assessed during the due diligence phase of selection.

Yes, as long as all countries of implementation are targeted in this call for RISE proposals. See annex 1 in the call for proposals for a full list of eligible countries.

There is no limit in the call for proposals. The number of partners should be realistic and based on the proposal’s scope, activities, and budget.

Yes. However, please note that there can only be one lead applicant submitting the proposal and contracting directly with IUCN.

Yes, an organisation can only be awarded one grant as a lead applicant. However, there are no restrictions for said organisation to also be a partner in other applications.

IUCN will directly contract the lead applicant and disburse funds for sub-granting. IUCN will try to negotiate options for direct contracting and granting to each partner but cannot guarantee it will be possible.

Yes, private sector companies are eligible but must demonstrate that the proposed project pursues strictly non-profit objectives and does not generate income. See sections 5.4 and 5.5 in the call for proposals on eligible and ineligible applicants and section 5.6 on requirements for partnerships and collaborations.

RISE seeks to fund evidence-based strategies to address gender-based violence in environment and climate-related programming. Thus, it encourages partnerships between environmental organisations, gender equality and GBV-expert organisations, Indigenous Peoples’ organisations, local communities and relevant experts.

Integrating a consortium or partnership must favour the technical and operational implementation of the project. Therefore, the applicant must include a narrative describing each partner, the specific role, relevant experience and added value in its proposal. See sections 4 and 5.6 to read more about the scope of RISE and the requirements for partnerships and collaborations.

According to the requirement in section 5.8.1, the direct beneficiary of the award must be a legally registered entity. This is necessary because if an award is made, it requires signing a grant agreement that includes a number of responsibilities for which legal capacity is required. The applicable legal registration requirement is the one required in the applicant’s country to be able to validly enter into a grant agreement and receive funds. This requirement applies to the lead applicant organisation and any consortium partners who will receive funding from RISE. 

According to the requirement in section 5.8.1, the direct beneficiary of the award must be a legally registered entity. The requirement is fulfilled with the formality valid in the applicant’s country of origin. In every case, it will be necessary at the eligibility verification stage to study the supporting documents attached to validate that the organisation exists legally as a legal entity, has a legal representative and can operate validly. 

Where governments have stopped registration services, IUCN will allow the submission of recent registration documents. However, organisations will have to clarify how they operate without valid registration and the validity of organisation bank accounts.

As per section 5.8.1, The direct beneficiary of the grant must be a recognised registered legal entity. The applicant must have the legal capacity to enter into contracts in its own name. Partnerships or associations that do not have legal capacity cannot be considered as direct recipients of financing, even if they sometimes act as executing agencies for public-benefit projects. This requirement applies to both the lead applicant organisation and any consortium partners who will receive funding from RISE. Non-registered partners should be listed as stakeholders as they cannot receive and manage funds.

SAM registration and UEI numbers are required if you submit a grant proposal to the US Federal government. Since the RISE grant proposal is submitted to IUCN and the contract is between IUCN and the lead applicant, SAM registration and UEI numbers are not required to submit a RISE grant application to IUCN.

RISE grantees participate together as a RISE learning cohort and benefit from technical support and community of practice from IUCN and partners via the GBV-ENV Center.

No, applicants are not required to have previous experience with IUCN or USAID.

There is no minimum number of beneficiaries for projects. IUCN will negotiate activities, budgets, and deliverables during due diligence.

Activities that promote institutional learning within an organisation or that develop Sexual Exploitation, Abuse and Harassment (SEAH) policies and procedures and self-and collective care structures of frameworks are allowed. As RISE seeks to fund evidence-based strategies to address gender-based violence in environment and climate-related programming, proposals should display strong linkages between gender-based violence and environment. See section 4 in the call for proposals to learn more about the RISE scope, purpose, and objectives.

No, it is not a requirement that you have an existing project.

RISE seeks to invest in: a) new interventions that address GBV in environment sectors; b) integrated approaches that embed GBV components in existing environmental programming or related activities; or c) existing GBV-environment programming that aims to continue, scale up or replicate an intervention.

As part of the due diligence process, applicants will be asked to complete IUCN’s Environmental and Social Management System (ESMS) screening questionnaire and provide necessary information for USAID’s Initial Environmental Examination, regardless of whether they have their own ESMS. All projects implemented by IUCN must adhere to the principles and standards of the ESMS; thus, RISE-supported projects must comply, with no exceptions.

RISE grantees will be expected to either have Sexual Exploitation, Sexual Abuse and Sexual Harassment prevention policies and procedures – or to include their development as part of their RISE activities – to comply with IUCN.

South Sudan is an eligible country for this round of RISE. In the application platform, you will be able to select South Sudan.

The targeted regions are Central America and the Caribbean, Eastern and Southern Africa and South and Southeast Asia. See annex 1 in the call for proposals for a full list of eligible countries. RISE does not have a preference for a particular country or population.

Yes. An organisation can submit an unlimited number of different proposals under this call as lead applicant and/or co-applicant during the application window. Nonetheless, an organisation can only be awarded one grant as a lead applicant.

They can be specific to one locality or cover a broader geographic area (national or regional). There is no preference under RISE.

Yes, lead applicants based in a non-eligible country can apply if they are an eligible organisation, and IF: They already have a presence in the country in which the activities are proposed to be implemented; OR have a duly registered local partner that meets the requirements for consortia and partnerships.

Please see section 5.7 on the call for proposals for details on the requirement of having a local presence in the country of implementation.

Contingent on the quality and priorities of the submitted proposals, RISE will be implemented in one or more of the targeted geographies. This may include funding more than one project in one or more regions.

RISE seeks to fund evidence-based strategies to address gender-based violence in environment and climate-related programming. Thus, the call covers all proposals addressing any aspect of gender-based violence and environment linkages. Successful proposals must demonstrate how they contribute to the conservation, restoration or sustainable use of the environment; as well as to preventing and/or responding to gender-based violence.

Yes, as long as the project addresses gender-based violence and environment linkages, the proposal is eligible.

RISE is interested in evidence-based GBV prevention and response approaches that directly contribute to addressing GBV and builds upon gender equality programming.

Yes, engaging men and boys are considered part of comprehensive gender-based violence prevention and response strategies.

RISE is interested in evidence-based GBV prevention and response approaches that directly contribute to addressing GBV and building up gender equality programming. Successful proposals must demonstrate how they contribute to GBV prevention and or response outcomes and environment outcomes, including the conservation, restoration and/or sustainable use of the environment. Applicants should link all complimentary activities to gender-based violence and the environment.

Yes – the call covers all proposals addressing any aspect of gender-based violence and environment linkages. Please note that RISE will not fund strictly research-focused activities, as outlined in section 5.3 in the call for proposals.

RISE seeks to fund projects that focus on one or more of the priority areas – it is not required to focus on all three of the areas.

The required documents consist of

  • Proof of registration (lead applicant and partners)
  • RISE declaration
  • Activity plan
  • Budget

Yes, there is an option to download each task. See the guidance on how to use SM Apply for more information.

Only the lead applicant must register and submit the proposal on behalf of all partners. However, SM Apply offers the option to add collaborators to the proposal if a lead applicant wants partners to support the application online. See the guidance on how to use SM Apply for more information.

We will try our best to respond to requests for feedback.

No, but we highly encourage gender balance within organisations. See section 6.3 of the call for proposals to read about the technical evaluation and finalist interview. 

IUCN is hosting the RISE grant challenge under its partnership with USAID on Advancing Gender in the Environment (AGENT). The grantees will report directly to IUCN.

Due diligence is carried out with the lead applicant but involves verifying that the partners are eligible (have registration) and are not on lists of excluded parties. IUCN will also review the partners’ budgets and may ask questions and request additional information. See section 6.4 of the call for proposals to read about the pre-award and due diligence process.

No. As stated in section 7.2 of the call for proposals, co-finance is not mandatory but encouraged.

RISE-funded projects can be integrated with other projects. See section 4 in the call for proposals for more details.

RISE seeks to fund

a) new interventions that address GBV in environment sectors,

b) integrated approaches that embed GBV components in existing environmental programming or related activities and

c) existing GBV-environment programming that aims to continue, scale up or replicate an intervention

Hardware and equipment costs are allowed in the budget; however, costs should be reasonable and linked to the technical proposal. As stated in section 5.3 of the call for proposals, RISE will not fund activities that centre around the provision of free equipment, construction, land purchase, or building new infrastructure. In the call for proposals, see Annex IV sections 4.14, 5, and 6 of the sample contract for more information.

The budget should not include indirect costs unless the applying organisation has a Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA). Alternatively, applicants can apply the de minimis indirect rate of 10% per 2 CFR 200.414(f).

There is no standard ratio for activities and operational costs. RISE budgets will be evaluated on their correspondence to the technical proposals, the reasonableness of the costs included, the optimisation of resources and gender responsiveness.

The Grantee must use the Budget Funds provided by IUCN for costs incurred in carrying out the purposes of this Agreement which are reasonable, allocable and allowable. 

(1) “Reasonable” means the costs do not exceed those that would ordinarily be incurred by a prudent person in the conduct of normal business.

(2) “Allocable” means the costs are necessary to the performance of this Agreement.

(3) “Allowable” means the costs are reasonable and allocable and conform to any limitations set forth in this Agreement

Limitations include any restrictions under IUCN and USAID procurement policies.

There is no set minimum amount allocated for M&E.

Yes, salary for staff and consultants is allowed. The original English version states “no fee or profit is allowed”, which means that proposals should not be generating any profit for the organisation nor should the organisation charge any fee to IUCN for the implementation of the project. 

Yes, IUCN is hosting the third round of the RISE grant challenge under its partnership with USAID on Advancing Gender in the Environment (AGENT). 

Lessons from previous grantees include the importance of establishing strong cross-sectoral partnerships to build capacities and broaden interests, areas of work and networks; and the importance of engaging men, including community leaders, in GBV prevention and response. RISE also enabled organisations to champion institutional change at the policy and programming levels.

IUCN did not host previous rounds of RISE, but you can check the RISE website to learn about past grantees and their projects.

See further reading suggested in section 4 of the call for proposals and visit our GBV-ENV Centre webpage for information and resources.

See further reading suggested in section 4 of the call for proposals, including our research paper on Gender-Based Violence and Environment Linkages and visit our GBV-ENV Center webpage for information and resources.

Submission of questions for RISE was extended to 1 July 2022. Questions can be submitted to the RISE email: RISE@iucn.org. Frequently Asked Questions will be updated accordingly on this website by 5 July.

The document with all the questions and answers is also available below. Click on the button if you wish to download it.

Application and award timeline

Stage 1 – COMPLETE – Proposal submission stage

07 June to 21 July 2022

Stage 2 - Eligibility screening stage

22 to 29 July 2022

Stage 3 – Technical evaluation stage

01 August to 27 September 2022

Stage 4 – Pre-award and due diligence stage

27 September to 08 November 2022

Stage 5 – Grant winners finalisation and announcement stage

09 November to 10 December 2022

Scroll to Top

Tweets by @IUCN_Gender

Support for Internet Explorer 11 has ended on June 15th, 2022.

We recommend you to use any of these browsers:

By using this site, you consent to the use of cookies and similar technologies to enhance your user experience. For more information please visit our legal section